Nickels and Dimes Workout

Nickels and Dimes is a fun workout you can do almost anywhere. At the top of every minute for 10 minutes you will complete 5 pull-ups (nickels) and 10 push-ups (dimes). By the end of the workout, you will have completed 50 pull-ups and 100 push-ups.

Your first set you may be able to complete the nickels and dimes within the first 20 seconds. As your workout continues, it will take longer to complete each set, thus giving you less and less of a rest period. By the 10th minute, you may not get to rest at all, and you will need to power through to complete the workout! It may sound easy, but it just 10 minutes you can get one heck of a workout.

You can modify this workout as needed. For example, you can do the workout for 15 minutes instead of 10, shorten or lengthen the rest period, or you can do pennies and nickels and complete 1 pull-up and 5 push-ups.

You can also change the exercises from pull-ups and push-ups to exercises that strengthen other muscle groups. You can do 5 tuck-jumps and 10 lunges, 5 leg raises and 10 sit-ups, or even sprint for 5 seconds and jog for 10 seconds. Each one of these will be repeated at the top of the minute.

I enjoy this exercise because at the surface it is very simple, every minute you do 5 pull-ups and 10 push-ups. But to meet your fitness goals, you can modify it to be a simple timed circuit that can be completed almost anywhere.

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2 Weeks to Health: Kick Start Weight Loss and Live a Healthier Life!

The first edition of this book is no longer available for purchase. Click Here to view 2 Weeks to Health first edition for free!

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If you’re struggling to lose weight or you don’t know where to start, you’re not the only one. I’m surprised by the amount of health and fitness information that is out there that makes us believe what we are eating and doing will help us lose weight and be healthy when in reality it is doing more harm than good. You will be amazed at how easy it can be to live a healthier life, lose weight, and prevent disease, but there are a few basics that we all need to learn. 2 Weeks to Health’s premise is that it only takes 2 weeks to learn these basics with just a few minutes of reading and some interactivity each day. If you have been struggling to reach your health goals, this is a good challenge that will change the way you think about health.

2 Weeks to Health is a 14-day crash course in how to change your life by giving you the information you need to lose weight, get fit, and feel better about yourself. But I warn you, this is not a way to “lose weight quick”. It is a tool to use if you are serious about living a healthier life, and it will likely be one of the most difficult yet rewarding experiences you have ever completed. Are you ready for a challenge?

Topics you will learn about include: Mental toughness, building habits, types of exercises, workout planning, meal planning, nutrition, dieting, supplements, motivation, and lifestyle fitness.

In addition to the 2 week challenge, included for free in 2 Weeks to Health is the e-book “25 Quotes to Motivate and Inspire You to Lose Weight, get Fit, and be Healthy”, and 2 weeks worth of workout and nutrition logs so you can keep track of your workouts and meals during the 2 weeks of reading.

I recommend this book for anyone who has a health related goal and who are unsure of where to start, or if you had difficulty in the past reaching your health, fitness, or weight loss goals.There are thousands of resources on the web telling you how to improve your health. With all that information it is often difficult to know where to start, and what really works. With a perfect mix of healthy tips, tricks, motivation, and science, 2 Weeks to Health is a great way to kick start a healthier you.

Quote of the Week – Dec 19

“I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy, I’m telling you it’s going to be worth it” -Art Williams

Whether you’re doing the 2 Weeks to Health Challenge or your own steps to become a healthier individual, set your goals knowing it’s not going to be easy. Along the way you will encounter sweat, tears, and often a lack of motivation. You must push through because health goals are worth it in the end. There’s no better feeling that hitting that first weight milestone, running your fastest mile time, or increasing your weight on the bench press. But in order to reach that feeling it won’t be easy. Push on, work hard, and stay motivated. It’s going to be worth it.

Do you have a favorite quote? Send it to 2weekstohealth@gmail.com and we will feature you in one of the upcoming weeks!

Quote of the Week – 12 Dec

“Don’t stop when it hurts, stop when you’re done!” – Anonymous

We will all have those workouts where we get 3/4 of the way through and our lungs are burning, we can’t talk without gasping for air, and our muscles want to quit. Even when it hurts, it’s important to remember that you will get the most out of your workout if you push through and finish what you started. Your body might tell you no, but your mind is more powerful that your body. Go in with the mindset that it will be challenging, and that you will conquer the challenge, regardless of the efforts it takes. Then when you’re done, you will know you are in full control of your mind and body.

Do you have a favorite quote? Send it to 2weekstohealth@gmail.com and we will feature you in one of the upcoming weeks!

 

The Grassroots Health Movement

Encourage, Educate, Exercise

In a study released by the CDC in 2015, almost 40 percent of American adults over the age of 20 are obese, while an additional 30 percent are overweight. This means 70% of Americans are putting themselves at a greater risk of developing diseases such as cardiovascular disease. With such a high number of us on the heavy side, I began wondering what kind of culture this is creating.

The American culture as a whole has begun to accept that being overweight is okay. With modern medicine being as advanced as it is, and most people holding jobs that do not require strenuous work, it has become culturally ok if someone wants to live their life in the 300-pound range. I understand that it is wrong to push people to change when they are not seeking change themselves, as it can make people feel uncomfortable. However, we need to begin to create a culture that fosters more people taking time out of their day to work on their health. I don’t think it will take government programs to bring down the overweight percentage from 70% to a lower level. Instead, it will take a cultural shift driven by us, the citizens.

In my recent article about a grassroots solution to obesity, I mentioned that words become action, and action becomes habits. To add onto that, collective habit becomes culture. Culture has a drastic effect on how a member of that culture behaves. Let’s look at the military as an example. When young men and women join the military, they are all within weight limits, but vary in their levels of fitness. Immediately from day one, military culture takes hold, and part of that culture includes daily workouts. Within a few months, someone who maybe has never worked out a day in their life may crank out 20 pull-ups at a time. The military culture drives soldiers to stay in shape, the same as the current American culture drives people to underestimate the importance of their health.

What does this culture look like in the office? Let’s say you are working in an office with 10 colleagues. Statistically, 4 of them will be obese, 3 of them will be overweight, 2 of them will have a healthy weight and exercise often, and 1 will be in great shape and work out regularly. Regardless of which one of these employees you are, you can take the same three steps to change your office’s culture to make it more healthy: Encourage, Educate, and Exercise.

Encourage: Any time one of your colleagues decides to make a healthy decision, offer positive feedback. If George decides to eat a salad instead of a burger, go to the park with his kids instead of a movie, or hit the gym after work, be friendly and say something “That’s awesome, I love going the park with my kids. It feels great getting out and stretching after sitting all day. Do you plan on making it a weekly thing?” This is a subtle encouragement for going to the park again, helping George stay active.

Educate: Learn and teach. Always try to learn more about how to live healthier, and spread your knowledge. If your colleagues enjoy bringing desserts into the office to share, try bringing in a kick butt sugar-free dish one day and see if anyone notices. Take small steps to show that healthier eating doesn’t mean you have to eat tofu for every meal. If the office likes to have a company outing every once in a while, volunteer to organize the next event and choose to do something active and fun like dodgeball. Show that exercise can be a lot of fun. Overall, share your knowledge in a non-intimidating way.

Exercise: This means set the example. To try to change the culture, get out and exercise, and try to eat healthy yourself. Don’t be like crossfitters and tell everyone every minute what you’re doing. When you’re looking good, eventually someone will mention it or ask for help, providing the opportunity to share your knowledge.

If everything goes well, encouraging, educating, and exercising will motivate a couple of your colleagues to start making some changes to live healthier. Now you might have 3, 4, or even 5 of your co-workers talking consistently about your health as common office talk. A culture of healthy living has begun to form.

It only takes one person to change the culture of a small group, but it takes time. As more small groups, families, or friends groups change their health culture, soon the collective American culture will begin to change, and the obesity percentage should begin to decrease. So be the change, start the movement toward better health, it only takes one to make a difference. You are the root of change.